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#AlumniForDivestment: Dave Dobbyn, alumni want UoA to Go Fossil Free

Published Wednesday 11th May, 3:30pm | Permalink | Photo gallery

 

Dave Dobbyn wants UoA to Go Fossil Free.

Dave Dobbyn wants UoA to Go Fossil Free.

#AlumniForDivestment

#AlumniForDivestment

 

Dave Dobbyn, along with a number of recent University of Auckland graduates, have made today a powerful statement – they want the University of Auckland to divest from fossil fuels.

The well-known musician, singer–songwriter and record producer held up a banner in Aotea Square in the centre of Auckland, where a large University of Auckland graduation ceremony was taking place, with the simple message “UoA: Go Fossil Free”.

Dobbyn’s gesture showed a strong sense of solidarity with a number of recent University of Auckland graduates also holding banners in the Square that, in protest, have refused to make any monetary contributions to the university as alumni until a commitment is made to divest from fossil fuels.

External donations from notable public figures and distinguished alumni make up a significant proportion of the University’s endowment fund of over $80 million, in which the University Foundation have so far refused to screen against fossil fuel companies, as part of their socially responsible investment strategy.

Today’s escalation, known as Alumni for Divestment, comes after Fossil Free UoA submitted a petition last year signed by 2800 staff, students and alumni to the University Council asking for them to support a divestment decision that was rejected.

Globally, over fifty Universities have joined hundreds of other institutions with assets worth $3.4 trillion and divested from oil, gas, and coal companies because of moral concerns about contributing to dangerous climate change, and for economic prudence.

Click here to view the full gallery of photos of Alumni for Divestment from this week’s graduation ceremonies.

 

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